“It was a pleasure speaking with you”; Meaning, Proper Usage, Different ways of Usage

"It was a pleasure speaking with you"; Meaning, Proper Usage, Different ways of Usage

If you want to end the conversation with kindness and yet want to keep your boundaries undisturbed, go for it. “It was a pleasure speaking to you” is a phrase used to end the conversation and to indicate that the conversation drove up well and yet to impart the tone, “I have to leave now.” Both “It was a pleasure speaking to you” and “It was a pleasure speaking with you” are correct. Yes, I mean it. Yet, there are different mutations and adaptations to know and to flatter the listener. Let’s go! 

  • Under The Lens of Grammar – Was/Has Been; To/With
  • Tone of Formal
  • Tone of Informal
  • Similar Phrases

Under The Lens of Grammar – Was/Has Been; To/With; Speaking/Talking

I am sure to overcome this doubt is insurmountable. Like whether to use “It was /has been a pleasure speaking to you “or” It was a pleasure speaking/talking to you or “It was a pleasure speaking with/to you.” Well, it depends on a variety of factors. For example, it depends on the person and your relationship with them. Sometimes, the kind of environment setting matters. Ex., it might be a personal or occupational setting. Sometimes, your tone and non-verbal communications matter. All might seem overwhelming, but it’s not. 

Think that you are texting the person after you two have left to let them know about the conversation. Here, it’s in the past, which is far gone. Hence, you are determined to use “It was a pleasure speaking with you” not “It has been a pleasure speaking with you.” Use the latter if you have just finished the conversation, then it’s in the near present. Now you can use ‘has been for sure. Also, it’s more genuine than the former.

“It was a pleasure speaking with you” or “It was a pleasure speaking to you”? Let’s come to that. ‘With you’ refers and involves both the person. So, if you felt that the conversation involved both the people and it hasn’t been one-sided, then you can use “It was a pleasure speaking with you.” Unless, if you felt that you were the only one pouring your lungs out in the conversation, then go for “It was a pleasure speaking to you.”

Jeff Bezos Career Advice
Jeff Bezos Career Advice

The difference between the use of speaking or talking is also the same. If you felt the experience was more like a conversation and not like a monologue, you can choose to say, “It was a pleasure speaking with you.” Unless if you mean the opposite, then go ahead with “It was a pleasure talking to you.”

Tone of Formal

Here comes the importance of non-verbal communication. Imagine a CEO saying, “Well, It was a pleasure talking to you,” with a straight, bossy face versus a date telling you, “It was a pleasure speaking with you,” with all the nonchalance. Thus, explained. As seen previously, you know to use the correct words in the context but, imparting a tone by learning these little nuances also matters. Let’s take you have roasted someone with all your sarcasm and, to give it a nice blazing end, use this phrase. Here, you mean your victory and, you emphasized it successfully.

Let’s take it’s the first time meeting with that particular person, and fortunately, it went very well. But you do not want to sound too boundless. With the right tone, you can impart kindness as well as the so-called boundary. In simple words, say it with a straight face with your lip grinning a little. You are all set.

Tone of Informal

Let’s take the same example discussed previously. Let’s keep you had a date and, it went exceptionally well. You might want to communicate the excitement. But also, you don’t want to put yourself out there completely. Here it comes, the right time to use the phrase. Say it with your eyes sparkling and a tinge of formality. You know what I mean.

Let’s say you had a blast with your friends at the party. Your conversation with all of your mates was sarcastic at its highest. You and everyone had a blast. Telling it directly that it made your day, in the end, will break that magic of the moment. If you want to keep it placid in this case, you can use this phrase, undoubtedly.

Other Similar Phrases

Because of its tone of kindness and professionalism, the above-discussed phrase is a standard way of expression, but it has passiveness that comes along with it. It might not work if you want to emphasize “you” prominently to clarify that you have enjoyed the conversation the most. In that case, you can use,

  • “I want to thank you for your time and attention.
  • “It was nice talking to you.”

Sometimes, you can be a little emphatic. You can say,

  • “It’s always a pleasure speaking to you.”
  • “It was a genuine pleasure speaking to you.”

You might want to as a necessity. After all, often, the standard phrase sounds negative or non-genuine. Because most of us out there use it to end the conversation and not to come up rude. Adding emphatic words will communicate your genuine pleasurable experience as a result of the conversation.

In a very formal conventional setting, you will be determined to cut out the word ‘pleasure’ and to say something like,

  • “I enjoyed our conversation.”
  • “I like what you said.”

In an informal, friendly setting, you might want to cut out the sentence in short. In that case,

  • “Cool, see you,”
  • “It’s a pleasure,” 
  • “Nice to chat with you,”
  • “Really nice to run into you,”
  • “Cool to see you,”
  • “Great speaking” will work flawlessly. If you want to be savage at its highest, try Luca Changaretta’s way of saying just “Pleasure…!” (You should hear this while reading) from Peaky Blinders. 
  1. Is it right to use “It was a pleasure speaking with you” instead of “It was a pleasure speaking to you”? Both should work great. In deep perspective, ‘with you’ enhance the meaning of two-way conversation and, ‘to you’ enhance the monotonous way of experience.
  2. Is it right to use “It was a pleasure talking to you” or “It was a pleasure speaking to you” ‘Speaking’ imparts the meaning of conversation and, ‘talking’ wins over the side monotone? For example, Either one might have been speaking more in comparison with the other.
  3. Is it okay to write “it was a pleasure speaking to you today” on an email follow-up after a telephonic professional discussion? As it’s in a passive voice, you may miss out on the emphasis you want to make upon yourself. Use active sentences. Also, as it’s a standard response, go for something like, “I want to thank you for your time and attention. It was nice talking to you.”

Conclusion

Go for it if you want to sound kind yet distant. Most people don’t mean it. Catch their gentility in nonverbal communication and body language. It will always work great informal setting. Why not some other phrases that mean more genuine won’t work in a friendly, personal space? Why not spread more kindness?

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do you respond to it was a pleasure speaking to you in an interview? Although they might mean it or not, always be ready to flatter them in return. You can say, “Same here and, really thank you for the time and effort.”
  2. Which is correct, “It was a pleasure meeting you” or “It is a pleasure meeting you”? The first, after the visit. The second, when the meeting is still going on. Additionally, the third “It has been a pleasure meeting you” when it has been just over.
  3. “It was a pleasure meeting you” or “it is a pleasure to have met you”: if either is possible, is there a difference? “It was a pleasure meeting you” when we have met in the past and, while recalling it now, I am saying, it was a pleasure when the meeting was happening in the past. “It is a pleasure to have met you” is the same as “It has been a pleasure meeting you,” when you have to say the pleasurable experience just started in the past and continues to the present.
  4. How do I finish this conversation with someone after a nice talk? Anything that speaks about the other person and the impact it created on you. Giving the benefit of conversation to others matters. It will keep up the positive relationship with the other. Go ahead with “You are right,” “Great insights,” “Inspiring,” “Enlightening.”
  5. How do you tell when someone is done talking? Lookup for the body language. Usually, when people are done, they will look away from your eye contact or will begin to sip water. Sometimes, taking a deep breath while you begin to answer notices that they have more to add. Looking up and lifting their head slightly will also be a reasonable gesture.
“It was a pleasure speaking with you”; Meaning, Proper Usage, Different ways of Usage

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