how long should you stay at your first job

How Long Should You Stay at Your First Job

how long should you stay at your first job

Some quit during their probationary period, others are still there after 20 years: How long you should stay in your job depends on many factors and is a very personal decision. Finally, your studies or apprenticeship are over, your degree is in your pocket and your career begins. However, many underestimate their first job and entry-level position. A study has now come to the conclusion that the first job can lay the foundation for the entire subsequent career. Anyone who chooses the wrong first job will run behind their professional opportunities for years and decades.

Average seniority of employees

It’s no wonder that many graduates are confused. While career counselors and experts advise working at least a year at any job before moving, some workers leave for much less time than recommended. A survey by Express Employment Professionals reports that 71% of college graduates spend a year or less in their first job.

It is certain that few workers work for decades with a single employer. The median employee tenure for 2018 was 4.2 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. On average, most people change jobs about 12 times in their careers.

When can you quit your first job?

Average turnaround time shouldn’t be the main factor in determining when you change jobs. Just because a lot of people move out after about a year doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t stay that long. The answer for you may be very different depending on your particular work situation, what you do in your current role, and your plans for the future.

However, you want to avoid making a reputation as a vacationer, so it makes sense to be sure before you move on. Ask yourself these questions to decide whether you should leave now or hold on a little longer.

Questions to ask before leaving your job

Are there difficult circumstances at work? Are you being abused, subjected to unethical behavior, or being asked to do something that disturbs your conscience? If you’ve tried unsuccessfully to remedy the situation, then start planning your outing immediately, no matter how much time you’ve been at work.

Are there difficult circumstances at work?

Are you being abused, subjected to unethical behavior, or being asked to do something that disturbs your conscience? If you’ve tried unsuccessfully to remedy the situation, then start planning your outing immediately, no matter how much time you’ve been at work.

Can you get a better job?

What are your chances of getting a better job? It can often be better to stay in your current job until you can get a job that is a step forward. The adage that it’s easier to find a job when you’re still employed is often true.

Are you learning new skills?

Are you developing valuable skills or gaining knowledge that will be useful in your career? If so, you might consider staying longer. Conversely, if you’ve been doing mundane tasks for over a year, it’s time to chart a change.

Are you underpaid?

If your payment hasn’t increased or is below the industry average after two years at work, you should probably start looking for a job. Research salaries so you know how much you are worth in the current job market.

Do you have another job offer?

If you’ve already applied for another job and have an offer for a better position, accept it, even if it’s only been a short time since you’ve been at work.

Are you considering a graduate school?

If you enter a college or vocational school in a field unrelated to your first job, you can usually feel free to quit your first job in less than 18 months.

What are your prospects for the future?

Is there a clear path to advancement that would allow you to make the transition to a more satisfying job or to offer yourself a more attractive boss or coworkers at your current employer? Exploring the options for moving sideways or vertically at your own employer may be worth exploring before you decide to quit.

How to quit your job

When deciding to quit that work place, be sure to maintain a strong work ethic and positive relationships with staff until you leave, as you will likely want to receive referrals. Future employers might perform background checks and get in touch with your former employer when considering you for a job. So, it is important to leave your work on a positive note as much as possible

Resign with class

Leave the right way. Be sure to give two weeks’ notice if possible, and avoid being negative in your resignation letter or email. Be as useful as possible to your future employer by offering to train your replacement or give an overview of your plans to other team members.

Prepare for a background check

Potential employers might perform background checks and get in touch with your former employer when considering hiring you.

Don’t stop on a whim

Ask yourself if there is any reason to stay in your current job or move sideways within the company.

Also Read: Gift Ideas For Someone Leaving A Job

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