What is the biggest misconception about you? – Behavioral Interview Question

How to Answer the Interview Question-What is the biggest misconception about you?

Knowing yourself and gaining confidence in yourself can help you make your future, especially in work-related areas. Answering misleading questions in interviews and making a human mistake to choose broad adjectives for oneself doesn’t impress employers. How do we answer the question- What is the biggest misconception about you? If you don’t know the answer to this question, don’t worry, we got you How I Got My Job has prepared a list of proficiency nuggets to help you in such situations.

What is the biggest misconception about you?

To answer this question or any such difficult question in interviews, do not hesitate or panic. You can speak up about how people usually perceive you and how you think it can help the interviewer and his business. Answer whatever you think defines you the most and turn your misconceptions into your strengths. And remember, confidence is the key. 

Tips to Refer To

  • Self-analyzation – Make sure you know everything about yourself- your strengths and weaknesses. To do this, you can note down and make a list of traits that you think define you the best- both positive and negative. Analyze them and make sure you are ready to answer positively if anyone asks you about them.

  • Turn your weakness into your strength – Everybody has weaknesses, but those who know how to manipulate them into something resourceful are those who ace such interviews. For example: – If you think people perceive you as a very “novice,” you can turn it into your strength and describe yourself as someone who can easily get the work done from peers. 

  • Pick something that aligns with the company’s needs – We need to list out traits that go hand in hand with what the company is looking for. If you list out the word “unwelcoming” for a collaborative company, it won’t be appropriate. Instead, you could go for company-inclusive adjectives like “frank” or “candid.”

  • Be honest – Trying to impress the interviewer and listing out positive traits instead of misconceptions is now a tired tactic and won’t lead you anywhere. However, being honest about yourself and listing out traits that you think would benefit the company would go a long way. So, be truthful and try not to sugarcoat words.

Turning Confidence into a Personality Trait

No matter what the interviewer asks, they always notice how you answer just as much as what you answer. You must work on your confidence to impress the employer. Try not to be hesitant or give away your nervousness. Instead, answer like you already knew the question was going to be asked. “Confidence is key” wouldn’t be a saying if this weren’t true.

Oversharing in Interviews

Jeff Bezos Career Advice
Jeff Bezos Career Advice

When you perceive that the interviewer has asked you a personal question like this, you tend to be more casual or relaxed. But don’t let the friendliness of the employer make you feel any less professional. Tighten your tie and answer your question with utmost sincerity and confidence. Again, the interviewer notices your body language. 

How to Find the Perfect Answer?

If you want to stand out, make sure you know how you interact with people and how they perceive your traits. When you start noticing your flaws and resources, please start thinking about their positive outcomes and benefits. The interviewer only asked this question to know why he should employ you. So, give them just what they asked for and list out the outcome of your quality.  

Conclusion

Building a strong resume, getting an opportunity to pitch for yourself, and opening the door for selling yourself in an interview aren’t the only things we need to focus on. Knowing ourselves and focusing on our strong and weak traits will help us crack any interview and answer questions with confidence, which will provide the employer with just what he was looking for.  

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I let them know that I am the right fit?

The best way to let the employer know that YOU are the one they are looking for is to describe yourself in enough detail to paint a picture and spell out the result. You need to make them realize what they would be missing in the company and how you are a beneficial asset. You will have to analyze yourself, know your resources, and most importantly, be real and yourself.

  1. How do I choose the right statements if I am in a dilemma?

It can often happen that while you are being interviewed, more than one answer pops up in your mind. It is important to note that you need to choose the answer that best aligns with the company’s needs. Make sure your answer is real and candid enough to describe you truly and seems favorable to the employer.

  1. How do I manage to stand out?

It is important to note that you don’t always have to seem extra formal. It might be tiring and boring for the employer. You can make yourself comfortable, but not to the extent of being casual. While answering your questions, you can add a little spice. You can reply as if you have been prepared your entire life for this and can let out a smooth and easy conversation that leads to a conclusion of your best assets.

  1. What if the way I describe myself seems “generic”?

The adjective you choose for yourself may seem generic. There are two ways we can go about it. Either you can make sure that the adjective you chose describes you the best, and you can explain and conclude it in such a way that the outcome of your characteristic impresses the interviewer. Or you can go for synonyms of the adjective you chose- you can look for a completely different way to answer the question by making unafraid statements that help you stand out. Note that the word can be generic until your description isn’t.

Also read Superintendent Position Interview Questions 101 [+Sample Answers]

What is the biggest misconception about you? – Behavioral Interview Question

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